National

By Glenn Young

  There has been huge focus this election year about efforts to suppress the vote in key states where the Republicans control the legislature.  All forms of voter ID laws and voting limits have been put in place in these states.  Some fortunately have been found not legal … and courts have prevented implication.  Some such as Pennsylvania still stands (one of the most crucial of all) … The state of Ohio has attempted many approaches … which have mostly been withdrawn. 

 But now here comes one in Ohio what seems to reveal the final card in the effort of the Republicans to take the key states by interfering with the rights of people to vote.  It now appears that in Ohio and other states … there will be massive effort to challenge voters at the polls (by “poll watchers”) who are being trained to go into “the right districts” and challenge virtually if not actually everyone … thereby slowing the voting and … preventing people from voting by grinding the process to virtual halt … and then …

 By obnoxiously and consistently stopping the process … hope to trigger violence and to shut down the voting  completely  … and by stimulating violence … will also keep many away from the polls (as well as to show what horrible people these are  … rioting because the line is slow  … what people these 47% ers are  … etc.) And maybe even have the state police and national guard suspend voting in the “affected areas” for the good of public safety.

 So the plans are in place  and nationwide there has been more than one million people recruited to be the anti-vote shock troops of the Romney campaign … and they will be at the polls bright and early.  They have gotten their training and the goals are clearly to stop the voting in areas that support Obama … and to create the violence that such efforts would bring about …

 This is their ace in the hole … and they are willing to play it … normally you could say I’m just being paranoid …. But clearly there is extensive proof out there that this is the plan and goal of the organization True the Vote (despite what they may protest) and other extreme right wing groups.

 What can we do?  Poll watching is legal … challenging voters is legal … they can legally destroy the voting process on the election day…

 We need legal actions now to create injunctions (to allow for reasonable challenges) to stop deliberate wholesale challenges  … and we need  Democratic poll watchers to work to above all prevent violence … and we need to get as much early voting as possible to avoid the challenges at the polling stations from effecting the outcomes.

The plan is out there   … These Republicans have shown they will stop at nothing …. We need to show that it is their plan and take steps now  … prior to their implication of the final voter repression action of the election

 For background on this … see  http://www.demos.org/publication/bullies-ballot-box-protecting-freedom-vote-against-wrongful-challenges-and-intimidation

 And also see  http://www.truethevote.org/about/

A college student’s first protest takes him directly into the big leagues

By Connor Miller

The Occupy Wall Street movement and subsequent protests that are continuing across the United States have drawn world-wide attention. Our correspondent, a college freshman, participates in the first demonstration of his life. Here is his point-of-view of Occupy Wall Street.

Before I went to Occupy Wall Street, I did some research to see what I was protesting. I went to Occupywallst.org which told me the time and location of the occupation, but not much more. “The one thing we all have in common is that We Are The 99% that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1%,” claimed the site. I felt like I could buy into this cause, so I got a couple of people from my college dorm just outside New York City to come with me to Manhattan to be stereotypical protesting college students. We were going to go down in history, just like the kids from the UC Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the Paris spring of 1968, and Tiananmen Square. Hopefully not just like Tiananmen Square.

I was a little apprehensive about going at first. A couple weeks ago, two girls from my school were sprayed in the face with mace. Someone caught it on video and put it on the unofficial Sarah Lawrence blog. I watched it several times to try and gauge how painful it would be to have mace in your eyes. 

Posted: December 12, 2010 by Davey D in 2010 Daily News, Political articles

On Thursday morning,
December 9, 2010, thousands of Georgia prisoners refused to work, stopped all other activities and locked down in their cells in a peaceful protest for their human rights. The December 9 Strike became the biggest prisoner protest in the history of the United States. Thousands of men, from Augusta, Baldwin, Hancock, Hays, Macon, Smith and Telfair State Prisons, among others, initiated this strike to press the Georgia Department of Corrections (“DOC”) to stop treating them like animals and slaves and institute programs that address their basic human rights.  They set forth the following demands:

• · A LIVING WAGE FOR WORK
• · EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
• · DECENT HEALTH CARE
• · AN END TO CRUEL AND UNUSUAL PUNISHMENTS
• · DECENT LIVING CONDITIONS
• · NUTRITIONAL MEALS
• · VOCATIONAL AND SELF-IMPROVEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
• · ACCESS TO FAMILIES
• · JUST PAROLE DECISIONS

A college student’s first protest takes him directly into the big leagues

By Connor Miller

The Occupy Wall Street movement and subsequent protests that are continuing across the United States have drawn world-wide attention. Our correspondent, a college freshman, participates in the first demonstration of his life. Here is his point-of-view of Occupy Wall Street.

Before I went to Occupy Wall Street, I did some research to see what I was protesting. I went to Occupywallst.org which told me the time and location of the occupation, but not much more. “The one thing we all have in common is that We Are The 99% that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1%,” claimed the site. I felt like I could buy into this cause, so I got a couple of people from my college dorm just outside New York City to come with me to Manhattan in the tradition of  protesting college students. We were going to go down in history, just like the kids from the UC Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the Paris spring of 1968, and Tiananmen Square. Hopefully not just like Tiananmen Square.

 

I was a little apprehensive about going at first. A couple weeks ago, two girls from my school were sprayed in the face with mace. Someone caught it on video and put it on the unofficial Sarah Lawrence blog. I watched it several times to try and gauge how painful it would be to have mace in your eyes. 

From Ralph Nader

 Yesterday morning, eight doctors, lawyers and other activists stood up to Senator Max Baucus.

And the private health insurance industry.

And the corporate liberals in Congress.

The eight activists demanded that single payer - everybody in, nobody out, free choice of doctor and hospital - be put on the table.

And as a result they were arrested.

And charged with a so-called "disruption of Congress."

The Associated Press, Wall Street Journal, Politico, Democracy Now and National Public Radio all carried stories about the protest.

C-Span carried it live.

And it was widely disseminated on the Internet.

Baucus crafted a hearing to kick off the health care debate in the Senate yesterday where 15 witnesses would be at the table to discuss health care reform.

The insurance industry was at the table.

The Business Roundtable was at the table.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce was at the table.

Blue Cross Blue Shield was at the table.

The Heritage Foundation was at the table.

And corporate liberals like Andy Stern, Ron Pollack, and AARP were at the table.

But not one person who stood for what the majority of Americans, doctors, nurses, and health economists want - single payer - was at the table.

Not one.

When I heard about this corporate line-up last week, I called the office of Senator Baucus.

And politely asked that, as a matter of fairness, a single payer doctor be allowed to testify.

I was told -  no way, Ralph.

The deal is done.